Skip to main content
6:00 am
♪ a number of lawmakers now saying we're not sure this is worth the fight. less than 100 al qaeda in afghanistan. do we need to stay there? >> i believe would do. we have the right strategy and the last brigades are arriving. i would let this go for a while longer. with regard to the small number of al qaeda in afghanistan that may be a reflection of combat power in afghanistan. >> good morning. it's monday, july 26th. welcome to "morning joe." i'm mika brzezinski. joe is off today, although we are going to bring him up from a remote location on the web in just about an hour. a lot going on today. we have with us on the set msnbc
6:01 am
contributor mike barnicle, msnbc and "time" magazine political analyst mark halpern and bat cue can nan is here in new york and harold ford jr. who is the author of the upcoming book, "more davids than goliaths." we have so much going on. a huge morning of news ahead. several developing stories. first the chilling lead story of "the new york times" this morning and front page of "the washington post" tens of thousands of leaked classified documents on the war in afghanistan paint ago bleak and grim portrait of what exactly our troops are up against there. what the reports show and how they ended up on the front page. we'll have that. also what did the white house tell scotland about its decision to release the lockerbie bomber? this was right before he was freed. a new report this morning could spark even more outrage
6:02 am
depending how you look at it. my dad, i called him last night. dr. zbigniew brzezinski will be our guest. plus, the administration's pay czar. he releases that much anticipated report on those bloated wall street salaries. interesting what he found. let me look here at the results. his finding was as the economy was crumbling, wall street fat cats were taking massive bonuses. are we shocked? i want to know what we waited sl 18 months for. >> well, what the report says is that in several of the cases that they were locked in legally. >> right. >> to provide -- >> it doesn't name any names. i got a lot of questions for them. i really do. i'm sorry. >> let's get them here right now. >> ken feinberg will be here on the set at 8:00 eastern time to explain. it just seemed a little underwhelming. also willie is out today sick. he is taking a sick day. >> please. >> but in his honor, governor
6:03 am
chris christie is taking on his biggest challenge yet in new jersey. i say that very carefully. because he actually wants to clean up new jersey. he takes issue with that show "jersey shore," and actually talked about it on a sunday morning talk show. he hates snooky. could that be? i kind of like what he had to say. i fully endorse it. to our top story. the u.s. military says hundreds of american troops are searching for two navy sailors who disappeared in a taliban stronghold in eastern afghanistan on friday. yesterday, the taliban claimed they killed one of the sailors and took the other one as a prisoner, after both were forced from their armored sport utility vehicle. however, nato officials have not confirmed the reports and still characterize the men as missing. there are also conflicting reports about whether the body of one of the two has been recovered. the war in afghanistan also getting attention this morning by the release of the more than 90,000 classified field reports i mentioned. they were made public by an
6:04 am
organization that says its goal in disclosing secret documents is to reveal unethical behavior by governments and corporations now, the documents span from january of 2004 -- from 2004 to january of this year, and paint a bleak picture of the situation on the ground there. according to "the new york times" one of the news organizations that was granted early access to the reports, they reveal this. that pakistan may actually be working against the u.s. effort, allowing representatives of its spy service to meet directly with the taliban in secret strategy sessions to organization networks of militant groups that fight against american soldiers in afghanistan and even hatch plots to assassinate afghan leaders. let's stop right there. mark halpern, i would take it that is one of the leads out of these many documents that have been revealed? >> well, there is most blockbuster facts in here or new revel lags that are going to make people think anew about the
6:05 am
war in terms of facts. but it does add texture to a lot of the misgifgs of people inside and outside the government have had about this conflict and it raises a question in the sheer volume of this leak we haven't seen much of this in american history. >> it's like the pentagon papers. a huge document dump. i agree with mark. the pakistani intelligence services had been known to have aspects or parts of that unit dealing with the enemy and believed to be on the side of the enemy with that good journalist reporting this, suggesting this, so this tends to confirm exactly what we've been reading over a long time. it also tends to confirm taking a look at the whole afghanistan war, is this a winnable war. >> yeah. the issue of 92,000 classified documents by the organization called wickaleaks, they are having a news conference at 7:00 which we may dip into as well. barnicle? >> there is one troubling aspect of it. i would like to ask harold about
6:06 am
it. the conference in the white house's rebuttal that the documents only cover the bush administration's involvement in afghanistan. if this administration thinks they are going to be able to skate on saying, that well, that was during the bush administration, i, for whatever it's worth, they are sadly mistaken. >> i think the majority of americans would agree with you. little now now this president and this white house is not only in charge but have made monumental decisions about our role, our continued involvement in afghanistan and i think to pat's point it raises a fundamental question, i think, even more so that you had richard haass on the show, i believe, last week, skus discussing his front page news story whether or not it's winnable. i think it will push the question each more for the forefront to pat's point. >> there have been a lot of foreign policy experts who have changed their views on this war and it's interesting to watch the arc of that happening.
6:07 am
here is some other revelations from these documents. that the taliban has used heat-seeking missiles to shoot down u.s. helicopters. a fact that it has not been publicly disclosed by the military. pat, do you find that interesting on a number of levels? where do those missiles come from? >> you wonder if some of them came back from the old war in the '80s to the stingers, ronald reagan gave to the afghan. >> working from a capture kill list of about 70 top insurgent commanders has sometimes gone wrong, killing civilians and stoking afghan resentment. also -- >> some of that has been out there, though. that is not altogether new. >> a good point. the performance of the drone aircraft less impressive than officially portrayed. some crash or collide, forcing american troops to undertake risky retrieval missions before the taliban can claim the drone's weaponry. it's hell. >> why barnicle's point is so on point. the administration should just
6:08 am
take ownership of some of this and explain that in war, these things happen. and the success we've had with our drone activity has been portrayed in all national newspapers and national journals, for that matter, around the globe opinion in fact, there have been some mistakes we should own up to it and move forward. i think things in this report are untrue that the administration should challenge as any administration should, but the reality, i think the american people recognize we're at war and these things -- some mistakes, unfortunately, happen. >> this will advance the argument and maybe come after november, but the major part of the democratic party and the congress of the united states has had it with this war. you got and anti-war movement small and moving inside the republican party. dane rah rorbacker worked with me and a speech writer in the reagan white house. he loved these guys and bringing them in and out of the white house when i was there with reagan. is moving towards anti-war position and so are the conservatives up there against this war and against iraq. there is real ferment in
6:09 am
politics an i think break out in january especially if the democrats take a beating." what these documents do is remind us of the media and the government during a time of war. the government wants to play down the negative. governments lie at times of war. they are not truthful. these documents show what flesh on a lot of the things this administration does not want to talk about. we need a full debate and i think these documents give us the entryway into that. >> we need to have john kerry with hearings like on vietnam. took bad wikileaks wasn't around where we could save lives. >> he makes it clear this does demand we do a more careful oversight of what is going on by the executive branch in the legislative branch. >> you saw dick lugar raising questions about it.
6:10 am
very respected middle of the road republican. i guess he is deputy chair of that committee. no doubt which way the trend of this has gone which questions are -- is it worth it? and i think that side of the argument is clearly going to -- >> fundamentally, the most important player now is david petraeus. if he is able to show some progress it will quiet some of this but unclear if he will be able to do that. >> the white house came out strongly against these leaked reports. pointing out they do not cover events in 2010. after the obama administration announced their new strategy, national security adviser jim jones said this in a statement. the group made no efforts to contact us about these documents.
6:11 am
as we've mentioned the founder of wikileaks holding a news conference at 7:00 eastern time and doing that in london to talk more about these documents. does the administration have a point, pat, especially when we're very critical of those who reveal the names of cia agents and some of the work that's being done in these countries, that sometimes has to remain classified for the safety and security of our nation? >> sure, no doubt a real argument for secrets. what we have in "the washington post" 850,000 people entitled to look at top secret documents in the government. you cannot really hold this stuff that tight. i will say people dumping these doupts from inside, if they've taken an oath, i have a real problem with those folks. they are the ones that should be fired and prosecuted but you can't prevent the media from getting this material. we will talk about this more. we will revisit this. a few other big stories this morning. efforts to permanently plug bp's busted well back on track this
6:12 am
morning after delayed last week due to tropical storm bonnie and officials say a rig that is drilling a relief well is being reconnected to the pipe and may be in position to resume operations in the next few days. meanwhile, bp says no final decision has been reached on a change of management after reports that chief executive tony hayward is on his way out. >> what? >> yes! yes. getting his life back. >> oh, no! >> getting his life back, barnicle. don't worry. like wall street, he will be very comfortable. he will leave with lots of money. bp's bode is board is scheduled to meet today and scheduled to discuss an approved hayward's departure. i believe it's going to entail a delicious exit package that he deserves great deal greatly. sort of like the wall street that destroyed our economy. >> wall street doesn't cause the greatest -- >> they caused the greatest economic disaster in our nation's history.
6:13 am
>> taxpayers provided something called t.a.r.p. >> nice of them, wasn't it? sweet. >> mika, no doubt about it. everybody played a little role in this because people bought homes they couldn't buy and charged on their credit cards they couldn't afford. they paid the t.a.r.p. money back plus interest. it was a single greatest investment -- no, the banks that's not aig. the other culprits is fannie and freddy. let's put it in context. the single profit we've enjoyed as a nation and quickest profit we've enjoyed as a nation from a single investment is from t.a.r.p. bank of america where i work, citigroup and others have paid back their money. i don't mean to defend them but let's be honest about the entire thing. >> they backed it up. >> but -- pat, if you look at the balance sheet, the fed, they haven't done bad either as a result of this. their balance sheet is larger than it was because of these interest payments. i don't want to defend the behavior but we ought to at least talk about it in its full
6:14 am
context. >> okay. >> what about the guys that did the oversight on fannie and freddie on capitol hill. >> i was in congress. we all share some blame. >> harold, listen. we will do this more. my understanding is t.a.r.p. has been paid back sort of. >> by the banks, right. >> didn't aig get bailed out? didn't they funnel money? didn't they help the banks? >> goldman sachs, bailed out the german banks. >> had he me understand. >> paid for their gambling debts that were lost. >> i didn't suggest what happened with aig probably should not have been paid. i think you have to talk about it in its context and talk about it specifically. >> goldman sachs got $12 billion through aig -- >> thank you. >> yeah. >> i'm not defeing that, pat. i only talk about the banks and t.a.r.p. who received direct payments. they paid their money back. aig there shooven should have
6:15 am
been greater scrutiny about this. >> they were allowed to go back and forth. we're a bank, we're not a bank. they made themselves bank holding companies. >> i wish i could do that. what did the obama administration know about the release -- >> probably did. >> it apparently pays off. what did we know about the release of the lockerbie bomber? a new report sheds light on that. it's fascinating. the political playbook is next putting the skis on rangel. exclusive details what house leaders are threatening to do to force him to make a deal with the ethics committee. the "morning joe" midterm exam. i love these. another all-star panel breaks down the biggest issues that will influence voters in november. first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> i hope everyone had a wonderful weekend. the heat was incredible and temperatures insane around virginia. 105 in richmond yesterday. d.c. was 99. i hope this was it for the big heat wave. much better today.
6:16 am
d.c. 90 and sunny and still hot but not humid. the rest of this week 90 to 95 and friday should be gorgeous. if you're heading into next weekend. the thunderstorms from yesterday, that was not fun. a lot of people still without power down around d.c. and baltimore but waking up to clear skies and sunshine right now. here is the forecast. a nice looking monday in new england and ohio valley from pittsburgh to cleveland to chicago, it looks good. thunderstorms and heat, though, still in the southeast as you'd expect with thunderstorms from atlanta to new orleans. look at denver getting hot out there in the middle of the country. you're watching "morning joe" on this monday, brewed by starbucks. ♪ [ dealer ] during the autobahn for all event,
6:17 am
you can get a great deal on a volkswagen. sounds terrific. cars built for the autobahn. actually, we're both pretty conservative drivers. ooh! shoot the gap. shoot the gap! whoo! so, they all come with carefree maintenance? yep, scheduled maintenance is included. i like the color. good. [ male announcer ] the autobahn for all event. lease the jetta limited edition for $199 a month or get 0% apr. ♪
6:18 am
and this one i'm taking to the house. the ice cream man is here! breyers all natural grasshopper pie. walmart's the only place you can get it. they love it when i take my work home with me. [ shaniya ] daddy i want more ice cream.
6:19 am
6:20 am
hey, guys. gm has a new application that lets you honk your car's horn from your iphone. that seems convenient, right? hey, watch it, buddy! no, not you, not you. i'm sorry. there was a car. there was a car that was going -- oh, really? yeah, well screw you! i don't want to undo something. what is this? gary got a promotion. that's interesting. >> welcome to "morning joe." 20 past the hour. time now to take a look at the morning papers. we start with wall street embattled bp chief to exit the company. the company expected to name robert dudley to succeed tony hayward. >> mississippi sun times. >> farewell!
6:21 am
>> bye, tony. mississippi sun times. workers return to fixing the oil well in the gulf after bonnie died down to an area of low pressure before coming to shore early sunday. >> detroit news. ford reveals 2011 explorer thinking that customers will emgrace the reincarnation of its iconic suv as a car-based crossover. >> we're going to have ford ceo on the show coming up a little later. >> that should be interesting. ooichl mime ago. mike allen is with us on the political playbook. house leaders apparently putting the pressure on charlie rangel to strike a deal with the ethics committee. he is going to reason? at some point, doesn't he step down? >> well, yes. and it's not going to drag out. you know, they were supposed to be announced thursday and if you want to send a message to
6:22 am
somebody at the top, send it to "morning joe" and the political playbook. house leaders want him to resolve this before they are ais -- announced. a lot of people like charlie but not willing to lose their seat over this. if it drags into the august recess this will be fodder for republicans and will hurt candidates in tough races. they think he can stay in office. they think he can resolve it with an apology that would end it. but unlikely to be chairman again saying, look, charlie you're not holding the gavel again. the fight isn't worth it for you or for us. >> people outside of his district, mark halpern, are thinking why. what gives here? it's pretty basic, isn't it? he really was not honest with his taxes and the position that he's in, this seems like a pretty easy done deal. >> he's in a pretty perilous position. two things going for him. members of congress circle the
6:23 am
wagons and think that could be me. none of them want to be the first to be the one to break the dam and say this guy should go. the other thing is this is charlie rangel's life and what he knows. his life would be so different if he gives up this job. he will fight to keep it. >> he will fight. >> charlie is also a very well liked guy by both parties in washington, d.c., the media. i've had him on cross fire for years. he is well liked. his problem is out in the country, they don't know him. out in the country you can portray him as a corrupt congressman running ways and means and imposing taxes on folks which he ain't paying his own. >> he's a great guy, no argument about that. but this comes at a moment when they are about to decide whether to let the bush tax cuts lapse and raise the tax rates for, you know, most americans. >> i guess he's a great guy, i'll take your word for it but i got to tell you he seems, in the face of this, to be acting extremely arrogant at a time
6:24 am
when people are tired of arrogance from washington. >> very harsh this monday morning. >> am i? i don't mean to be. >> may be a little laxity there. >> thank you, pat. mike allen? good lord! thank you. mike is saying nothing. okay, maybe i'm the only one who will say it. okay. mike allen, thank you very much. how will the independents influence the november election? will the president be used to help democrats? our all-star panel tackles those questions coming up in the "morning joe" midterm exam. we will be right back. ♪ here, kitty. here, kitty. oh! just come snuggle with mama. [ male announcer ] missing something?
6:25 am
like 2 pairs of glasses fo$99.99 at sears optical, with bifocal lenses for just $25 more per pair. hurry in to sears optical today and don miss a thing. [ man ] if it was simply about money, every bank loan would be a guarantee of success. at ge capital, loaning money is the start of the relationship, not the end. i work with polaris every day. at ge capital, we succeed only when they do. whoo! awesome! yes! we've got to get you out of the office more often. ♪ my turn to drive. ♪ my turn to drive. i'm from the gulf coast. my family spends a lot of time here. i have a personal interest in ensuring that we get this job done right. i'm keith seilhan. i'm in charge of bp's clean up on the gulf coast. bp's taken full responsibility for the clean up, and that includes keeping you informed. over 25,000 people are included in the clean up operation.
6:26 am
our crews are cleaning the gulf beaches 24/7. we're going to be here as long as it takes to make this right. [ male announcer ] when you put everything you've got into it, have the accolades to prove it, and extend a 60-day handshake to honor it, the only thing left to do is share it. the ram tent event. drive one without a payment for 60 days,
6:27 am
and if it doesn't do everything you ask it to do, bring it back. ram.
6:28 am
welcome to "morning joe." 28 past the hour. a new report is out that may shed light into what the obama administration knew about the release of the lockerbie bomber. the sunday times of london says it's obtained a accordance between the u.s. and the uk that reveals the white house weighed in on the matter before al
6:29 am
megrahi rah released. a scottish official familiar with the memo said this. wrah re. a scottish official familiar with the memo said this. arah re. a scottish official familiar with the memo said this. s rah r. a scottish official familiar with the memo said this. eleased. a scottish official familiar with the memo said this. remember, they said he was dying. and would be dead in three months. and he is not. that was almost a year ago. yesterday, the u.s. ambassador to the uk reiterated that the u.s. had, quote, strongly objected to any type of release. this comes as a senate panel set to hold a hearing this week in connection to the lockerbie bomber without some key witnesses. so far, the doctor who said al megrahi had three months to live, the scottish justice who made the decision to release him and a transfer agreement between the uk and libya said they will not be testifying.
6:30 am
mark halpern, you have some new information about the accordance between the u.s. and libya? >> well, this letter has not been released. the u.s. ambassador has said it happens will be, we're told now, by a senior government official, the state department is considering putting this letter out and releasing it. the text of this letter will be important. it's true that the government, if this letter is accurate as it's been reported so far, objected to his being sent back to triply but it suggests and we're waiting for an answer from the government to explain, the american government. it suggests the -- the u.s. government knew in advance it was under consideration that he be sent back to libya and that would be -- >> why is that important? >> that would contradict statements by the president or others or at least seem to, that suggests that he was surprised and shocked that this was even on the table. >> we looked up sound bites of the white house, the president and, i believe, it was robert gibbs reaction to the release. very muted if i read the transcript themselves. we will play them later. i remember being struck at the
6:31 am
time thinking where is the condemnation? where is the president at a microphone saying we condemn this transfer, we condemn this release, we stand with the families of the victims and -- and he did not. >> before this thing went down, we knew there was negotiations of some kind going on. why didn't the americans step in and say, abort this thing. >> right. >> this guy is not going back, especially if he is not going to die in three months. >> the letter has been reported and suggests this, that, as we talked about on the program a number of united states senators led by some democrats from new york and new jersey want these documents, want testimony. this letter is released, it's important it be released but there is going to be questions about what else was known at the time, what other documents there are. >> i feel like there are unanswered questions to put it lightly. fair enough? that's a quick look at another top story we're covering and get back to our big story of the day
6:32 am
which pertains to afghanistan and pakistan. over 90,000 leaked documents, full coverage on that coming up. now, we go to sports with mike barnicle. >> the toy department, sports. >> play around for a while. >> last night in texas it was bring your dog to the park night. one of the hottest teams in baseball, texas rangers, taking on the division rival angels. and guess who was there? in addition to the puppies. think about it. texas. george w. bush in attendance with his wife laura. elvis andrus a hit to right field. here comes chris davis running over jeff mathis, the angels catcher. hangs on to the ball. shades of mike scioscia, his manager, one of the best plate protectors of all time. rangers win 6-4 and improving their lead in the west to seven games. in the national league, cardinals/cubs. great rivalry. at wrigley field, tied in the
6:33 am
11th inning. felipe lopez puts this to bed. solo shot to right field. division leading cardinals beat the rival cubs 4-3. leaving lou piniella sitting on the bench crying. so long, lou. alex rodriguez, you remember him? one of mika's favorites. still chasing his 600th home run. yankees and the royals in the bronx yesterday. bang, fastball off his left wrist. that hurts. down goes a-rod! he had to leave the game. but the yankees end up winning 12-6. a-rod promises he'll be back in the lineup tonight chasing home run number 600 as the yankees play the indians in cleveland. finally. yesterday in cooperstown at the hall of fame, the hawk touched down in cooperstown. former cubs and red sox player, andre dawson inducted into baseball's hall of fame yesterday. along with, check the outfit on him. excardinals manager whitey
6:34 am
herzog. it doesn't look like whitey. >> what is he wearing? >> no that is johnny bench pretending to be whitey herzog. not bad. he went into the hall of fame whitey herzog did along with former umpire doug harvey and announcer john milan. one of the great announcers of all time. i think that's about it for sports. no, no, no. this is your favorite story. former "dancing with the stars" champ helio castroneves. es accused yesterday of blocking will power. that is a guy's name, will power. castroneves had no idea he blocked him and crossed the finish line first. he thinks he has run the race. his crew tells him that the judges ruled scott dixon is the actual winner. so castroneves goes nuts and storms to the judge's tower in the infield and clearly upset about the call. then security comes over. watch what he does.
6:35 am
grabs one by the shirt. they say, hey, sorry. take a peek. you lost. you finish in tenth place. get out of here. >> get over yourself. it's such -- whatever. >> thank you. >> that is sports. >> thank you. we have a lot of big stories to cover this weekend including the big story out of afghanistan, pakistan, the release of over 90,000 documents. one of the indications from this documents is that pakistan was helping the enemy and, of course, with the money that we send over there, that is a big bad problem for us as we deal with whether or not we move forward in the way we are in afghanistan. what will flurns voters this november? defending the garden state. a subject of conversation on the sunday talk shows? keep it here on "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. ♪
6:36 am
6:37 am
♪ a day once dawned ♪ ♪ and it was beautiful ♪ ♪ so, look, see the sights ♪ that you learned [ male announcer ] at&t covers 97% of all americans. at&t. rethink possible. buy a pantech messaging phone like the impact, and get a pantech messaging phone free
6:38 am
6:39 am
♪ welcome back. now to the "morning joe" midterm exam. a series we're doing this week on the political races that will matter the most in november. we sat down with our panel of experts pat buchanan, eugene robinson and chuck todd to break it all down. >> let's look at the influencers. the people influencing this election. start with the independents. what is driving them right now? >> what is driving independents
6:40 am
i think what is driving a lot of folks overall which is this concern about the economy and independents have been these folks that have already left the political parties we've been watching this the last 20 years, right? they have been moving away from identifying with either the republicans or the democrats and they are sort of driven, i think, by events of the day so independents, for instance, lost by republicans over competency and management of the war and also of katrina and right now democrats are suffering and the president is suffering on independents over management of the economy. and concern about the economy. so this is this group of folks. the real question i think all of us have at the midterm do they show up and how many show up and how many vote. a lot of them might not show up other than nevada where they get to vote none of the above. >> it's been so volatile, gene, the independents in '04, they went with bush. in '06 went with the democrats. '08, obama. in '10 do they go back to
6:41 am
republican party? >> have the republicans given them a reason. >> do they need to get mere reason or is it a no against what democrats are doing? >> polls are not showing that the republicans are shooting out the lights. republicans -- proolf rating for republicans in congress is lower than that for democrats in congress. so it's not -- what the republicans have not given them is what you guys gave them in '94, a contract with america, a program, a set of ideas or policies that people can believe in. i think that's been a mistake. >> pat, if the republicans haven't given their agenda a plan, specifically, can you beat something with nothing in off-year elections? >> republicans haven't given them a reason to vote republicans but democrats have. this is the problem. barack obama and the administration, this is an anti-elections coming up. those independents and take it ethnically. barack obama did very well amongity white voters and even
6:42 am
white working class votes, hillary voters came over to them. they are gone. the white house middle class is gone and african-american community is 24-1 or whatever it is. but lost its enthusiasm. energy, fire. the real fire out there is the people want to go and vote against barack obama and socialism, whatever you call it. the economic issue chuck is talking about, i saw a cbs poll, 40%. no other issue that reached 10%. >> let's just remember that most decisive elections any time we've ever had are usually rooted in some sort of anti, or anger. the last time i remember a decisive election that was one run with a positive was lyndon johnson. go through the line. '94, 2006, 2008, had a root of anger. >> what about using the president along the way to help democrats? >> there are parts of the country where you can use the president of the united states
6:43 am
and other parts where you would not. we've talked recently with joe sestak. maybe you bring him in to philadelphia but i don't know where else in pennsylvania you bring him in to a tight race there. he went into missouri for carnahan and he was over in kansas city. various places the president of the united states will do good and others places you don't want to take him. >> the deep south you probably don't take the president. do you bring the president in if you're meek to help new florida? >> in that race, certainly. but there's a bizarre three-way dynamic there and the president is not going to come because of charlie crist. >> what about missouri? >> i would say this. i think you will end up bringing him in in st. louis. i would make this argument to democrats. is that all of the bad is l. there. okay? all of the good, which is try to get the base out, particularly in st. louis, isn't going to be there without the president sort of fired up. so missouri is going to be fascinating. i'll say this overall.
6:44 am
the president can be used to save senate races where he is a real drag is on the swing house districts because most of those house districts are in places he didn't win in 2008. so i think that's where we sort of had two different dynamics here. he is the guy you bring in to save senate races. murray and boxer, feingold, florida, we throw -- >> ranked. >> but you're not going to bring him to jason altmyer's district. >> you can bring bubba into some of these districts. >> that may be the influence here, right? >> back then. >> bill clinton you send to parts of pennsylvania you don't want to send barack obama. chuck raises a salient point in that the democrats won a lot of house seats the last two elections that, you know, generally would be thought of as republican seats or that certainly in the past have been republican seats. >> let's underline that for a second. democrats have had almost historic back-to-back victories in '06 in the house and '08 in
6:45 am
the house. there was going to be a realignment regardless -- if unemployment were at 4. >> they weren't going to build on '06 and '08. >> right. >> in 2010. >> but as we look at influencers, is there any concept out there -- i look at the tea party -- that really could influence this next election cycle to an extent where you see a mark? >> unions. >> tea party has brought passion. >> sure. >> they have brought a new sort of passion. i think it's brought some new people into the political process and those people are going to come out and vote, most of them at least, against the democrats, so that's certainly is in favor of the republicans, i think. until they get elected. then i don't know what it means for the republicans. welcome to meet the tea party contest. ♪ [ engine turns over ]
6:46 am
[ armstrong ] in 20 years of cycling, even when i was ahead, i was always behind. ♪ behind cars... behind trucks... behind those guys... tailpipe... [ clucking ] ...after tailpipe after tailpipe... [ engines rev ] ...until now. ♪ the 100% electric... no-tailpipe nissan leaf. innovation for the planet. innovation for all.
6:47 am
no, it's just for new people. hey ! chocolate, vanilla, or strawberry ? chocolate ! chocolate it is ! yeah but i'm new too. umm... he's new... er... than you. even kids know it's wrong to treat new friends better than old friends. at ally bank we treat all our customers fairly. with no teaser rates... ... and no minimum deposits. it's just the right thing to do.
6:48 am
and this one i'm taking to the house. the ice cream man is here! breyers all natural grasshopper pie. walmart's the only place you can get it. they love it when i take my work home with me. [ shaniya ] daddy i want more ice cream.
6:49 am
even responsible people get into accidents, which is why we do all we can to help you move on after one. [ engine turns over ] and when you insure both your home and car with us, we dit for even less. . urance. responsibility. what's your policy?
6:50 am
♪ kind of not the same without willie. i guess i could say, oh, yes, is it time for your meds and special walkie? >> my walker, i left it out to the side of the set. >> mike, take over. >> one of your favorite stories is coming up. >> good. >> "the jersey shores" nicole, snooky. >> i don't care about this. >> she was on the front page of "the new york times" sunday style section. country that? >> no. >> yeah. 2,000 words about the reality starlet who is focused on her life before "jersey shore" and even included an interview with her dad andy. in it, he questioned why his daughter attracted so much
6:51 am
attention, saying -- here is andy now. now let's get a peek at snooky. >> no, let's not. >> let's see if we can't get her up on the screen. there you go. her father doesn't know why she's famous, okay? >> okay. >> all right. snooky and the rest of her "jersey shore" friends made their way into the political rooen yesterday when new jersey governor chris christie talked about their impact on the garden state. >> it takes most of the new yorkers, drops them at the jersey shore and tries to make america feel like this is new jersey. i could tell people they want to
6:52 am
know what new jersey really is, i welcome them to come to new jersey any time. the jersey shore is a beautiful place and a place everybody should come on vacation this summer. we have another six weeks or so of summer left. come to new jersey. >> i love it. i love him. he is right. >> he is right. >> say no more. thanks for wasting our time. >> shrsy shore and christie. >> at least he raised the bar a little bit. when we come back the leak on the classified afghan war documents. also next hour, former national security adviser dr. brzezinski will be on the show. keep it right here on "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. ♪ what is your name baby maybe we can see things the same ♪ ♪ now don't you worry [ dealer ] during the autobahn for all event,
6:53 am
you can get a great deal on a volkswagen. sounds terrific. cars built for the autobahn. actually, we're both pretty conservative drivers. ooh! shoot the gap. shoot the gap! whoo! so, they all come with carefree maintenance? yep, scheduled maintenance is included. i like the color. good. [ male announcer ] the autobahn for all event. lease the jetta limited edition for $199 a month or get 0% apr. ♪
6:54 am
6:55 am
6:56 am
♪ four minutes before the top of the hour. live pictures, first, of new york from chopper 4. thank you very much. we're also monitoring a press conference that is taking place across the pond at this hour. it's starting in a few minutes. it's from this organization called wikileaks, that released over 90,000 documents pertaining to the afghanistan war. these documents raise two major
6:57 am
questions, among many others. first of all, reveals that pakistan is potentially training the enemy in afghanistan. of course, pakistan we pay billions of dollars in aid. the question is this how they are using our resources? also, the documents illustrate perhaps why after the u.s. has spent over 300 billion dollars over there in the war in afghanistan, perhaps why the taliban is stronger than it has been in a long time. we'll get to that in a moment. here with us now is national political correspondent john heilemann who is the co-author of "game change" along with mark halpern who is us. we have pat buchanan and mike barnicle and joe scarborough joining us from a remote location via the web which is great to get joe's take on all of this. let me first lay the groundwork for this story. waf in afghanistan is getting more attention by the release of 90,000 classified field reports
6:58 am
that were made public by wiki leaks, an online organization that says its goal is disclosing secret documents to reveal unethical behavior by government and corporations. the documents span from 2004 to january of this year, and paint a bleak picture of the situation on the ground in afghanistan. now, among the most shocking findings, the paper reveal pakistan may be working against the u.s. effort allowing representatives of its spy service to meet directly with the taliban in secret strategy sessions to organization networks of militant groups that fight against american soldiers in afghanistan an even hatch plots to naet af assassinate afghan leaders. they are used heat seeking missiles to shoot down u.s. helicopters and u.s. forces actually covered up 2007 helicopter attack claiming that taliban members brought down the coalition helicopter with
6:59 am
conventional weaponry when, instead, they used a missile. also the documents reveal a top secret group of american forces, especially tasked with hunting down top taliban leaders and either killing or capturing them on the spot without a trial. the obama administration has apparently increased the missions, despite some killings of civilians. also in these documents, nato troops are relying on remote-controlled predator drones more heavily. we did know some of this. howevers the performance of the drone aircraft is less than portrayed. some crash and collide and forcing american troops to undertake risky retrieval missions. some of the documents detail the disappearance of money meant for humanitarian aid such as the case of an orphanage that had no orphans at the site a full year after its opening. civilian death tolls are rising consistently with the taliban conducting a successful roadside
7:00 am
bombing campaign. one document cited 2,000 civilian deaths from roadside car bombs alone. that's just a small portion of what these documents reveal. the white house came out strongly against the leaked reports, pointing out they do not cover events in 2010 which is after the obama administration announced their new strategy. national security adviser jim jones said this in a statement. first of all, mark, break this down to us. it seems to me the lead here, among other things is the pakistan angle. >> it's not new because it's reported by "the new york times" one of the three organizations with these documents and others for a long time there is great
7:01 am
concern within the american government that the -- some elements of the pakistany element agents have helped the enemy in -- >> do these documents solidify those concern? >> they don't -- i don't think they -- on the merits make it any more detailed or concrete. on that issue and many others, though, as we've said before, this provides texture and a pathway into i think a greater discussion of that concern on the part of american officials and how long-standing it's been. >> pat? >> i think it's worse than that in the sense. we lost 60 guys in afghanistan in june. i think we're up to 56 right now in july. and what this says is not only that the pakistani intelligence services have lines to the taliban, but they are training them and plotting with them to kill americans and to kill afghan leaders, and something like this, here's a country we give billions and billions of aid to in pakistan, and the idea
7:02 am
that elements of their government are participating in a war killing american troops, when our casualties are rising and there is no end in sight, i think that puts a real accent on this war and i think there's going to be a rising opposition as a result of this war because of the way this plays out. >> it's horrible, but you knew it yesterday. >> you knew, but this sort of gives you -- look, here is exactly what they are doing here. plotting and they are planning and they are training the guys that are killing our troops which is a lot different than the pakistani intelligence has lines to the taliban which is sort of a more fuss. >> another big story we're following. i got an e-mail from dennis mcdonough on the lockerbie story i have to read as we go through there. joe scarborough, we had his shot up on a remote location and working on that. he is joining us on the phone. joe, do you agree or disagree with our panel that says this shores up what is only the concern about the different
7:03 am
dynamics, pakistan potentially helping the enemy in afghanistan, hor do you think this reveals a wider problem? >> well, this confirms what we've known, but it makes it much worse. and it forces the white house today to come out and explain some things. they are going to have to explain why american taxpayers have been paying tens of billions of dollars over the past decade, propping up pakistan who is using that money to train our enemy, to kill american boys and soldiers, men and women, and why we are going to continue to call them our ally, our national security adviser jim jones put out a statement yesterday saying that we were going to continue working with pakistan. the fact is pakistan is not our ally. pakistan is not our friend. pakistan is working to kill american soldiers. they are working to prop up the taliban. they are working to undermine our efforts. and this is, obviously, the
7:04 am
worst of all problems because not only is pakistan the most dangerous country in the world, it is also a critical ally for the united states if we were to win this war in afghanistan, but at this stage, again, all of these documents raise a much bigger question and that is why is it that after spending $300 billion in afghanistan in this war, why is it, after barack obama has decided, following his general's advice, to triple the number of troops in afghanistan. as "the new york times" reports this morning, we are in a worse position in that country than ever before and the taliban is stronger today than ever before. those are questions that have to be answered. and i've got to read this very quickly from sebastian younger's war, mike barnicle and i have read it and some of the others have. but susan picked this out last
7:05 am
night. she has been reading the book, too. and listen to this. this is on page 249 of this classic work on afghanistan. the men know pakistan is the root of the entire war and that is just about the only topic they get political about. you don't have to be in the army to notice it. pakistan is effectively waging war against america. but the administration back home refuses to even acknowledge it, much less take any action. the soldiers who are fighting and dying know that pakistan is the enemy in the war zone. the people running the war, do they know they are working with the taliban to kill our troops and, yet, the last administration, the bush administration, and this administration, the obama administration, continue to deny the truth. and that denial continued through yesterday when our national security adviser
7:06 am
continued to suggest that we were going to keep going forward with pakistan as our ally as if nothing happened. well, we're going to have to have a come to jesus talk with pakistan and either they are going to be for us or they are going to be against us. this is devastating news. >> you know, joe, that passage is interesting. pat buchanan is here, because we clearly, from news reports over the past year, year and a half, there is a sanctuary that has been provided the taliban in fighting us in afghanistan and the sanctuary is called pakistan. in 1969, 1970 in another war, another time, there was another sanctuary called the parrot speaking cambodia which pushed richard nixon into the invasion of cambodia. >> exactly right. sixty days in there and cleaned out the eight sanctuaries. i talked to a guy yesterday who had gone in with those troops. yeah, but we went in there and cleaned those things out.
7:07 am
but the point joe is making here and this raises what is the depth and extent of the collusion between the pakistan intelligence services and the taliban, how high does it go? how high is it sanctioned? does it go all the way up to the head of the pakistany military sort of almost a day facto leader of the country. do we know this? is this tolerated or a war inside pakistan between those who support us and those who support the taliban? but this is going to elevate this issue. >> the problem is we've been -- we've been having this discussion with pakistan and recently with musharraf since the fall of 2001. this is not new. and what is so disturbing is, again, you read thets reports from the sebastian younger and others who say pakistan in the war zone is the enemy and, yet, this white house and the last
7:08 am
white house want to pretend that's not the reality on the ground in the war zone, that they are working activity against us, to undermine us. it reminds me, pat, and mike, speaking about vietnam and cambodia in 2004, i spoke to a special ops guy that was flying back over to afghanistan and he was no fan of the bush administration. i said, hey, is the iraq war really distracted us? is that why things -- why we haven't gotten osama bin laden and aren't moving as quickly against the taliban as we could? the guy looked at me and laughed like i was a fool. >> yeah. >> unless you can use those troops and invade pakistan, we're just wasting our time. this is 2004! >> right. joe, let's get some basics here to lay down the framework for this discussion. john heilemann and pat buchanan, what exactly would pakistan's angle be here some what is the value to them to help the
7:09 am
taliban as opposed to accept our money and work with us? >> they think the taliban is going to win and think karzai is not going to win and want a backup in afghanistan and look at the main enemy as india and the pashtun, they are more pashtun in pakistan. what they want is when this war is over they want to have an ally in afghanistan which, frankly, they did. when the taliban were in charge there and their main battle it gives them depth against india which they see as the main enemy. >> barnicle? >> john heilemann, there is one element here we haven't gotten to yet this morning and the political ailment here in the united states of america. and it's pretty clear and has been for quite some time, there are no hearings in afghanistan, haven't been. john kerry chairman of the foreign relations committee no hearings like in vietnam. this great discontent and disillusionment with afghanistan i think out in the country and
7:10 am
we have an american military that is at war in afghanistan, but not the country. the country is not at war. there's no frame of mind out in the country. very few people know anybody who is serving. what happens this fall with afghanistan politically off of this report and past reports? >> oh, i think the situation is getting a lot grimmer politically. you know, there have been news reports -- i was in washington last week and talking to various people on the hill. no question that in both the republican party at the highest levels on the -- people have experience and speaker tes in foreign policy and on the democratic side, support is eroding for the administration's position on the hill. now you have this report which the administration rightly points out only goes up to december of 2009 which, of course, is when barack obama made his big strategic shift. i think they rightly point that out. the problem for them is that the big change took place, obama stepped in and made this decision, i think the impression
7:11 am
for many people was that putting more troops into afghanistan that we were near to finishing the job, that's what the frame was. we will have a surge into afghanistan and we will begin withdrawing in the summer of 2011 because we're close to victory. what this tells us in the biggest macro sense is that the situation in afghanistan was much worse than we thought it was in december 2009 and all of the news since december of 2009 has been grimmer and grimmer. so you have this picket of things haven't been worse than we thought before and eroding further from that point on. so the political support across the spectrum, i think, is right on the precipice of crumbling around the administration. >> secretary gates and secretary clinton and obama himself have been walking back away from that -- july 2011 deadline when we start withdrawing troops. it is now conditions based.
7:12 am
the administration is hardening its position we're going forward with petraeus in charge when the country is moving in the other direction. >> we've talked about this before. mika, your father brought it up two years ago. we've had other people talk about the situation. the problem in afghanistan is perhaps one of the most dramatic examples of mission creep that i can recall. when we went in in 2001, we were going in to clean out al qaeda. it was an antiterrorism war. that has morphed into an anti-insurgency war where, instead of killing osama bin laden, instead of breaking up al qaeda, now we are building hospitals, schools, infrastructure, waste waste treatment plants and putting our soldiers and our marines there to protect them with targets on their heads. we could stay in afghanistan for another 50 years with 500,000
7:13 am
troops. we would never rebuild a country that dexter philkins told us 2 1/2 years ago who was a second century country. we are trying to do something in afghanistan that cannot be done. you can triple the number of troops, you can put a time line on it, but we are destined to fail because we are now engaging in nation building instead of anti-terrorism work. >> you know what would be nice, joe, mark you can speak to this if we, a, had a president of the united states who would hold a press conference and, b, a media in washington who would ask the president of the united states at the press conference how about a little refresher course, mark? why are we in afghanistan? >> the bush administration spent an enormous amount of time studying public opinion on the question of iraq and their big conflict and how you keep it high enough and sustain enough public support for a war not going well.
7:14 am
this administration studies public opinion as well. i think they have not chosen to build it up by explaining the stakes. the problem is like vietnam. we have chosen to stake america's reputation and ability to say to countries around the world once we pick a fight we are going to win it on the worst possible place on the planet to stake that fight. this is a country, a place that you cannot win and others have tried. >> let me just say that is the position we are in right now. mark halpern, you have stated it. every president doesn't want to be a president that leaves without winning a war. guess what? we're going to have to leave afghanistan whether it is this president or whether it is the next president, be he or she a republican or independent or democrat. we will leave afghanistan without winning that war. the question is how much more americans are going to die before our leaders in washington
7:15 am
understand that we can engage in anti-terrorism but we can't engage in nation building there. mike barnicle, you've been raising john kerry's name all weekend. my question is when is onkerry going to step forward and ask the same question about afghanistan that he asked about vietnam in 1971? when is russ feingold going to say the same thing about a democratic administration' handling of a war that he said about a republican administration's handling of a war? when the anti-war democrats on capitol hill going to join with some anti-war republicans on capitol hill and ask the questions that need to be asked about afghanistan? if they aren't asking the questions, mike barnicle, you're exactly right, we're not going to win in afghanistan. draw perhaps. but how many americans die before washington admits that? >> joe, mark pointed out earlier that senator kerry had a rather
7:16 am
nuance statement and response to the wikileaks? >> he said we need to make the calibrations needed to get the policy right and that these documents make that goal more urgent. it will be fascinating to see if someone will eventually -- >> i'm on the phone line so i didn't hear. was that general wes moreland saying that or senator john kerry? >> the chairman of the foreign relations committee and someone, i predict some democrat is going to become the leading voice in saying this this has got to stop. >> you heard john kerry when petraeus was up on the hill a couple of weeks ago give an opening statement that was a lot more tepid. that's a pretty tepid statement. he was critical of the administration. i think john kerry may be that person. he has a lot of doubts what is going on. the question is when and if he decides to make a full break
7:17 am
from the administration. >> nobody at this table, i think, would say if we had it to do over again, let's go in and rebuild afghanistan. so the only reason we're staying is a lot of americans say we don't want another -- lose another war, we don't want another saigon and don't want the helicopters on the roof and don't want the beheadings and holocaust in cambodia. i think that is the one thing that is holding us from getting out there. we don't want to lose a war and the consequences of losing a war. >> a friend of mine returned from afghanistan about a month ago. i was talking with him about it. he said if they didn't have the hand-held rpgs, the rocket propelled grenades, they would be throwing rocks at us. >> we will have more insight on this story, this major story from former national security adviser dr. zbigniew brzezinski. what did white house tell scotland about its decision to release the lockerbie bomber.
7:18 am
a new report this morning could spark more outrage and we have an update from the white house and bring in chuck todd live from the white house on that. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. ♪ met an l.a. gal brought to this small town a small town just like me ♪ ♪ no i cannot forget from it is that i come from ♪ ♪ i cannot forget the people who love me ♪ ♪ i can be myself here in this small town ♪ ♪ and people let me be just what i want to be ♪ not even advil pm, is more effective for pain and sleeplessness. new motrin pm.
7:19 am
and this one i'm taking to the house. the ice cream man is here! breyers all natural grasshopper pie. walmart's the only place you can get it. they love it when i take my work home with me. [ shaniya ] daddy i want more ice cream. [ dog barking ] [ sniffing ] [ male announcer ] missing something? like 2 pairs of glasses for $99.99 at sears optical, with bifocal lenses for just $25 more per pair. hurry in to sears optical today and don't miss a thing.
7:20 am
7:21 am
♪ we have been in contact with the scottish government indicating that we objected to this, and we thought it was a mistake. we're now in contact with the libyan government and want to make sure that if, in fact, this transfer has taken place, that he is not welcomed back in some way but, instead, should be under house arrest.
7:22 am
we've also, obviously, been in contact with the families, the pan am victims, and indicated to them that we don't think this was appropriate. >> okay. that was president obama last year on the release of the lockerbie bomber. a new report is out that may shed light into what the administration knew about the release of al megrahi. the sunday times of london says it is obtained a accordance between the united states and the uk that reveals the white house weighed in on the matter before al megrahi was released. a scottish official said this. yesterday, the u.s. ambassador to the uk reiterated that the u.s. had, quote, strongly objected to any type of release.
7:23 am
live from the white house now, we have nbc news reporter and co-host of "the daily rundown." chuck todd is with us. mcdonough is the -- he said this. there were no talks about the release of megrahi. we remain extremely disappointed and, indeed, angered that megrahi is not in prison where he belongs. his crime was unforgivable and his sentence and mccasskill's decision should be denounced by all. further if you have time, he says, you remember it was clear in the days leading up to the scottish government's decision that megrahi's transfer and release was being considered and prompted our immediate level intervention. he listed many more. he goes on to say that they wanted to avoid the worst
7:24 am
possible outcome a hero's welcome for megrahi in libya. having said that, there are other ways to look at this, quote, letter, which i'm trying to get my hands on from the white house directly, which seems that there was some sort of discussion or just avoidance of what was happening. would you agree? >> i think there is a contradiction what was reported and what they are claiming. i mean, when you look at the letter, i mean, the way it was brin up written up by the british paper had sort of an edge to it, whatever you might say. but in the letter itself, it seems as if the position that dennis is taking there and what was said in the letter which was, look, the last thing they wanted was him going to libya. and that was the point of the letter. the people i've talked to about that that was point they were trying to drive home to the scotts which was don't send him back to libya. you're going to do a compassionate release, keep him in scotland and keep him under
7:25 am
some sort of house arrest there but don't send him back to libya. thank you. i think the actual letter itself and even the parts that were reported by the sunday times of london, doesn't contradict that. but, of course, look. everybody is looking for an answer. everybody is looking for finger point and everybody is looking for a scapegoat because everybody is mad that this guy, that it looks like the libyan government in some form or another, pulled a fast one, because this guy is still alive. >> yeah. i mean, everyone was told he had three months to live. i have to say just personally it seems strange, this confetti celebration of him walking off the plane. it just felt like on this side of the pond the reaction seemed, just my characterization, a little muted. i wanted to see utter condemnation. >> wrnt aren't we doing business as usual with the guy on who
7:26 am
sent him to blow up the aircraft and gulf -- we had a secretary of state, i think condy rice was over there, wasn't she, meeting with gadhafi? this is a guy that ordered the mass terror attack killing a lot of americans on that plane that took down 270 people. >> yeah. mark? >> let's get the whole letter and see. >> i'm working on that. >> i think the white house's position is compelling in terms they were trying to make the best of the situation as mcdonough pointed out to you they about a -- did a number of things to convince the scotts not to make this decision and doing it quietly and what was motivating scottish officials and nothing the american government could to to stop them? apparently there was not. >> bp, the company responsible for the largest environmental disaster in our nation's history, perhaps even in the
7:27 am
world, is now -- has just announced they will be drilling off the coast of libya and whether or not this exchange was mired in that. what our participation is, the united states, we question now. we're working on getting the letter. but my understanding from this letter and we'll get it and we'll look at it, is that the united states preferred release of this guy, what is it? a compassionate release as opposed to a prisoner transfer and they wanted one type of release than another instead of keeping this guy in prison. chuck, am i wrong? >> that isn't what the letter appears to say. they said they preferred to keep him in prison. but they were doing -- look. if you guys are going to come to this decision -- i mean, let's take a step back here. imagine if another foreign government was telling our justice department what to do. you know? in telling us what -- so the fact is i think this was a very
7:28 am
delicate diplomatic dance this administration and any administration would have been doing which was to do this stuff as best as you can, back channel, you do this and say, okay, we don't want him released but if you release him, don't send him back to libya. again, i think this is a -- the way the story was written was pretty outlandish. >> we will get the letter. but doesn't it seem to you that perhaps there could have been a letter that says do not release this guy? we prefer nothing. he stays where he is and we condemn him getting anything he wants. >> it seems to be in there. but then i'll say this. let me play devil's advocate. if that is what you wanted and he gets released any way, then do you not want every effort made he is not sent back to libya? you got to sit there and play through all of the scenarios of what could have happened and all this. i think it's easy to back seat
7:29 am
drive this. >> when i get the letter, we will come back and maybe you can come back to us. the bottom line is this is important because 200 american families were destroyed by this. >> mika, what is more important is if the british government will release all of the accordance that bp had because that is something they are apparently refusing to do. >> quickly to afghanistan. these over 90,000 documents that are obtained and leased by wikileaks which is holding a press conference at this hour, showing that the war in afghanistan is perhaps even deeper anding forrier and more difficult than we ever expected and also pakistan. pakistan helping the enemy. what do you see the headline out of this, chuck? >> well, i think on one hand, it's going to be exactly what the times made the headline which was doubts about what kind of partner is pakistan in all this? now, everything we're learning from these leaks only confirms a
7:30 am
lot of the anecdotal reporting many of us have done on this. which is there isn't one government in pakistan. you deal with -- you have the -- you have the nonmilitary side, you have the military side and then you have the swelgs intelligence side and they all operate sometimes independently. and this issue with that isi is clearly still a huge problem. the same problem that a lot of folks said it was for decades. >> okay. chuck todd, thank you very much. we will talk more about this coming up. we will see you on "the daily rundown" after "morning joe." dr. zbigniew brzezinski is straight head on this developing story developing right here. keep it here on "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. ♪ [ dealer ] during the autobahn for all event,
7:31 am
you can get a great deal on a volkswagen. sounds terrific. cars built for the autobahn. actually, we're both pretty conservative drivers. ooh! shoot the gap. shoot the gap! whoo! so, they all come with carefree maintenance? yep, scheduled maintenance is included. i like the color. good. [ male announcer ] the autobahn for all event. lease the jetta limited edition for $199 a month or get 0% apr. ♪ [ animals calling ] apr. ♪ [ pop ] [ man ] ♪ well, we get along
7:32 am
♪ yeah, we really do - ♪ and there's nothing wrong - [ bird squawks ] ♪ with what i feel for you ♪ i could hang around till the leaves are brown and the summer's gone ♪ [ announcer ] when you're not worried about potential dangers, the world can be a far less threatening place. take the scary out of life with travelers insurance... and see the world in a different light. there's oil out there we've got to capture. my job is to hunt it down. i'm fred lemond, and i'm in charge of bp's efforts to remove oil from these waters. bp has taken full responsibility for the cleanup and that includes keeping you informed. every morning, over 50 spotter planes and helicopters take off and search for the oil. we use satellite images, infrared and thermal photography to map and target the oil. then, the boats go to work. almost 6,000 vessels. these are thousands of local shrimp and fishing boats organized into task forces and strike teams.
7:33 am
plus, specialized skimmers from around the world. we've skimmed over 27 million gallons of oil/water mixture and removed millions more with other methods. we've set out more than 8 million feet of boom to protect the shoreline. i grew up on the gulf coast and i love these waters. we can't keep all the oil from coming ashore, but i'm gonna do everything i can to stop it, and we'll be here as long as it takes to clean up the gulf. ♪ check the wife check the kids check your email messages ♪ check the news online ♪ ♪heck the money in the bank check the gas in the tank ♪ ♪ check the hottie walking by... ♪ ♪ ...wait that's a dude, no thanks ♪ ♪ check the new hairdo check the mic one two ♪ ♪ 'cause i'm about to drop some knowledge right on top of you ♪ ♪ you check a lot of things already why not add one more ♪ ♪ that can help your situation for sure ♪ ♪ check your credit score ♪ free-credit-score-dot-com free-credit-score ♪ ♪ you won't regret it at all vo: offer applies with enrollment in triple advantage. the 57th president of the united states.
7:34 am
♪ ♪ ♪ [ bell rings ] ♪ [ male announcer ] the nation's fastest mobile broadband network. at&t. rethink possible. buy a pantech messaging phone like the impact, and get a pantech messaging phone free after mail-in rebate. ♪ it's all right well it's all right ♪ ♪ welcome to "morning joe."
7:35 am
drilling efforts to permanently plug bp's bust well resume in the coming days after delayed last week due to tropical storm bonnie. bp says no final decision has been reached on a change of management after reports that chief executive tony he hasward is on his way out. still, bp board is scheduled to meet today and sources say they are expected to discuss and i proof hayward's sdart tour. hundreds of military troops search for two military sailors who disappeared in eastern afghanistan on pri friday. yesterday, the taliban claimed they killed one of the sailors and took the other one as a prisoner, after both were forced from their armored sport utility vehicle. however, nato officials have not confirmed the reports and still characterize the men as missing. former national security adviser zbigniew brzezinski is next on "morning joe."
7:36 am
♪ sometimes you win sometimes you lose ♪ ♪ and sometimes they get ahold of you just when you thought you had made it ♪ presenting the cadillac "summer's best" sales event. a fantastic opportunity to get a great offer on a new cadillac cts sport sedan... ..the most acclaimed vehicle in its class and a car and driver 10 best third year in a row. summer brings out the best in all of us, so now's the perfect time to get behind the wheel
7:37 am
of a brand new cadillac. now during cadillac's summer's best sales event... get zero percent apr financing for 72 months or this attractive lease offer on a cts sport sedan.
7:38 am
7:39 am
♪ i'm often asked this question, what is the most single damming revelation? what is the thing that is easily capturable, the single event, the single personality, the single mass killing. that is not the real story of this material. the real story of this material is that it's war. it's one damn thing after another. >> yeah. all right. that was the founder of wikileaks.org in a press conference in london this morning. addressing the documents on afghanistan that their organization released that are
7:40 am
making headlines and the "the new york times" and "the washington post" this morning. here with us is former national security adviser dr. zbigniew brzezinski. author of "american and the world." let's have this conversation this morning, dad. i would be surprised that anything in "the new york times" surprised you. you know about all of this stuff but let's go through some of the headlines from these released documents, the first being that pakistan, i guess more information, more confirmation about concerns that pakistan is helping the enemy in afghanistan given that we have given them hundreds of billions of dollars. what do you take away from this how the administration should be approaching these documents? >> i take away from it that there are two dimensions to these documents. one per tans pertains to the war itself, its pru tallity, its nastiness, its collateral damage, the euphemism of killing
7:41 am
civilians. we sort of know that but it gives you much -- someone on your program said earlier on your program texture and that is very important. but then there is the larger picture and that, i think, is easily misunderstood and distorted. i've already heard several times this morning that pakistan is the enemy and helping the enemy and so forth. the problem with this war is it's in a very complex setting in which there are no clear-cut enemies, nor clear-cut friends. just think of this -- first of all, pakistan is not the enemy. there is a war going on, a political war going on within pakistan about the future of pakistan and we are on the side of one part, but one part of pakistan is, in fact, against us. that's terribly complicated, but it is a fact and we have to face it. the army, by and large, under the general is sympathetic to us and it has done the right thing in pakistan itself, going after the taliban enclaves in
7:42 am
pakistan. the isi, the intelligence service, has, for years, sponsored the far more extreme groupings in afghanistan and when the west abandoned afghanistan in the late 1980s after they were forced out the taliban with the sift assistance of ini took over. to declare it an enemy is to shoot ourselves not in the foot, but in the head and beyond that there is the india pakistani conflict over the future of afghanistan if that they would like much more influence. the indians are working in that respect to some extent with the iranians because they want to have influence on afghanistan. go beyond that. the russians are sympathetic to the indian position. the chinese are more sympathetic to the pakistani position. and then there is al qaeda.
7:43 am
al qaeda which is hiding somewhere, but which we have, by and large, destroyed insofar as its capability in afghanistan is concerned, is fighting against us, but not about afghanistan or, for that matter, about pakistan. it's fighting against us about the middle east, about the future of saudi arabia, whether it becomes a fundamental state. about israel and palestine whether there is going to be peace or more war. and if we are going to be clumsy in reaction to all of this, if we simply going to plunge into really silly all-out condemnations of pakistan and making it into an enemy, we will probably contribute to a regional war that will span the whole region because in the background of all of this is intensifying pressure on us to go after iran and that could become a really massive international mess. >> mark halpern? >> dr. brzezinski, the national security adviser has condemned the release of these documents.
7:44 am
it is a huge number of documents. could you put in historical context what this kind of release means? how unusual it is? and what would you think people inside the pentagon, the national security establishment and the government, are thinking about this release, how threatened are they by the implications that someone or some individuals would put out so many documents to the media? >> i think concern over the loss of control over the process. maybe even the loss of control over the stort of region sort of regional kalg that we face. it is reminiscent of the pentagon papers at a time when the war was increasing difficulty and crisis. i think the release of these papers, obviously, is going to intensify public discussion in this country about the war and america's role in it. and about the way the obama administration is handling it. and i have to say that i have an increasing weary that we may be losing control over the management of our own strategy.
7:45 am
both vis-a-vis afghanistan and vis-a-vis israel and palestine and vis-a-vis iran and our hand may be forced and we may become part of a larger regional conflict, much larger regional conflict than the war in afghanistan itself. >> john heilemann? >> dr. brzezinski, you just went into the segue of the question i wanted to ask. you laid out a very ominous and complex scenario revolving around the hole of the middle east and afghanistan is only a part of that. then you just said you're starting to worry we are losing control of our strategy. talk about that. talk about whether -- about -- give us some detail of what you think the obama administration's view of that broader picture is and how confident we should be that they have their handle, have a handle on the big picture going forward. >> well, at one point, i thought i knew. but i'm less certain that i know. because there is some gap or discrepancy in between what the
7:46 am
president started out by saying in his speech in cairo and his speech in turkey, and what we appear now not to be doing in the middle east, essentially treading water or accommodating to the existing realities and let the forces on the ground determine the shape of events. insofar as afghanistan is concerned, i think we have formulated, the president has formulated a policy which i would define as consolidating our position, holding, reinforcing the afghans and disengaging. but i'm not sure that this policy can be pursued if we slide into some sort of a conflict with pakistan and i can see from the tenor of some of the discussions this morning there is growing pressure to oversimplify what is going on in pakistan to portray pakistan as our enemy, and if we do that, then we doom ourselves to failure in afghanistan because we cannot accomplish our
7:47 am
objectives in afghanistan without really having pakistan with us. and that is the problem. and as far as pakistan is concerned, it wouldn't be with us if we had the same time give more concern, more sympathy to indian concerns over nuclear programs, strategic relationship with india than we do over pakistan's concern for its own survival. >> all right. dad, i'm going to pass it to pat buchanan and just going to say what we're seeing so far out of this press conference from this organization wikileaks and one of the things that they revealed along the way and we'll find out more as we monitor this, but there appears to be evidence of war crimes. this is according to the wikileaks founder. we don't know more details about that, but i wonder as it unfolds, if that changes the dimension of the conversation. >> look. mika, i don't want to sound cynical. one of the tragedies of war is war crimes, because war is
7:48 am
fought by human beings who are, in many cases, fighting for their own survival on the spot and people threaten that fashion and do awful things. this is why i am so strongly for cautious policy in this region. this is why i don't advocate. i strongly oppose any military action against iran because it's easy to start yet another war. but to control it and to end it is difficult. under the course of wars, even innocent parties, parties which are defending themselves, commit war crimes. >> pat? >> doctor, i think you're seeing new pressure coming from capitol hill for israeli strike on iran. let me ask you what came out this morning. what does it tell you about the win ability of the war and the sustain ability of the war in afghanistan if, as you said, the chief of staff over there is with us and specialty army is with us, but the isi is heavily infill straight with pro taliban
7:49 am
people and they are training troops in pakistan to shoot and kill americans and afghan leaders, how long can this go on when they have -- our enemy has a privileged sanctuary of sorts inside pakistan to which it can return and come back and fight? >> well, pat, first of all, we do not know. perhaps you know but we do not know that isi is training troops to kill americans in afghanistan. we know they did this in the past. these documents, i believe so, somewhere in 2009 and i don't know whether those documents even from 2009 sustain that. but there is a war going on. a political war in pakistan regarding pakistan's own future. its own definition. i think we ought to be on the side of those who lean closer to us. but if we're going to be on their side, we also have to ask ourselves seriously what are the legitimate security interests of pakistan in afghanistan? does it make sense for its
7:50 am
neighbors, particularly india, to be trying to establish a political position trying to es political position in afghanistan which to the pakistanis is going to look like a jew political threat? and it's not worth it that the iranians are helpful in that respect to the indians. those are issues that we have to face. if we have a sense of outroonao we doom ourselves to failure. i don't know if the war is winnable but i think the war can be solved if we operate within an international context. instead of becoming the sole progress tag nis and that's the fateful legacy of bush president number two. >> mike barnicle? >> i'd like to thank you for pointing out one thing about the
7:51 am
most obvious statement made today in london accusing the united states of potential war crimes in afghanistan. war is an inherently messy business. thanks for pointing to that. >> dad -- >> commits horrible, tortures and murders. >> right. >> you know? >> if a cold blood. >> yeah. dad, thanks very much for coming in. last minute. good i got him on the phone last night. appreciate it. i'll call you later. >> good to talk to you. >> does a rebound by detroit automakers signal a rebound for the american economy? we'll bring in alan mulally. hey guys, i got some more savings for ya,
7:52 am
7:53 am
and this one i'm taking to the house. the ice cream man is here! breyers all natural grasshopper pie. walmart's the only place you can get it. they love it when i take my work home with me. [ shaniya ] daddy i want more ice cream. uld switching to fifteen percent ori take more on car insurance? does a former drill sergeant make a terrible therapist? patient: and that's why yellow makes me sad. i think. sarge: that's interesting. you know what makes me sad? you do! maybe we should chug on over to mambie pambie land where maybe we can find some self-confidence for you. ya jackwagon! tissue? crybaby. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more.
7:54 am
7:55 am
what it does is takes a bunch of new yorkers who most of the people on jersey shore, drops them at the jersey shore and tries to make america feel like this new jersey. i could tell people. they want the know new jersey is. i welcome them to come to new jersey any time. the jersey shore is a beautiful place and some place that everybody should come on vacation this summer. we have six weeks or so of summer left. come to new jersey. >> that's chris christie yesterday, a great guy. >> he is right. >> dead right. >> this is your favorite
7:56 am
segment. >> no. it's not. i like what he said. >> he was talking about jersey shore. and snooki. >> the snookster. >> i mean, really. >> there's snooki. >> congratulations, america. >> for all the information and more that you need about the jersey shore and snooki, we turn to our chief cultural correspondent -- >> no. shank. >> patrick j. buchanan, familiar not so much with snooki but with the jersey shore. >> i think i met snooki in 1959. >> we don't want to hear about it. >> let me tell you about this. i've gone to jersey shore, ocean city, leaving ocean city, maryland, new jersey's dry. you have to go a mile across there. get about 3:00 in the afternoon. you hit tony marts and the steel bar and i believe it was the band was up on the bar and huge bar. my chairman in new hampshire, deputy chairman one of the guys in that bar at the steel bar or tony marts.
7:57 am
up in new hampshire. >> pat, were you playing air guitar? >> he was on national television. >> up there on the bar, the whole band. great place. snooki was all over the place down there. >> i love that. >> pat buchanan and snooki, karoke festival in saturday. >> new jersey. >> he's got the most depth of any skang correspondent k corre >> makes you want to do a road trip with pat. >> the big story of the morning straight ahead. thousands of classified afghan war documents leaked. bring in "the washington post's" ezra klein collection on "morning joe."
7:58 am
when your eyes are smiling... you're smiling. and when they're laughing... you're laughing. be kind to your eyes... with transitions lenses. transitions adapt to changing light so you see your whole day comfortably... and conveniently while protecting your eyes from the sun. ask your eyecare professional which transitions lenses are right for you. long summer days, and not enough sleep. what i wouldn't do for a do-over. [ female announcer ] new neutrogena® clinical skincare. exclusive ion2 complex combined with activating cream helps restore collagen depleted skin. neutrogena clinical skincare is clinically tested to undo the look of a year's worth of skin aging in just 4 weeks. do-overs do exist.
7:59 am
[ female announcer ] new clinical skincare. neutrogena. #1 dermatologist recommended brand. with their autobahn for all event. it ends soon. they got great prices. cars built for the autobahn. people are gonna be driving crazy in the jetta... ...the routan, and the cc. that cc is gorgeous. that jetta is awesome. my wife loves her new routan. and they all come with that carefree maintenance. scheduled maintenance included. we're not shopping for cars here, people. c'mon! well, i am now. that's kind of exciting. [ male announcer ] right now, get 0% apr on 2010 models, excluding tdi. or get a great price on a certified pre-owned volkswagen.
8:00 am
8:01 am
the u.s. army is an enormous boat that's extremely hard to turn around. and the cover-up of those sorts of crimes begins at the bottom and moves its way to the top and new policy by obama does not mean a change of practice by the u.s. military any more than new policy by mcchrystal make a change in practice by u.s. forces. >> okay. that was the founder of wikileaks at a news conference
8:02 am
moments ago in london. it is the top of the hour, 8:00 on the east coast. welcome back to "morning joe." we are here with msnbc political analyst pat buttian nan, msnbc and "time" correspondent mike halperin. mike barnicle and me and joe from a remote location via the web to talk about the big stories today. we also have with us blogger for "the washington post." "newsweek" columnist and msnbc contributor eazra klein joining us from washington. before we get to the nuts and bolts of these over 90,000 leaks documents, joe, what is your takeaway when you road "the new york times" breaking the story late yesterday? >> well, the takeaway continues to be what we have said for sometime. that afghanistan is an unwinnable war. if you define winning afghanistan by rebuilding it and bringing stability there. if it's an anti-terror campaign, it works. if it's anti-insurgency it
8:03 am
doesn't work. i guess the biggest hoik for the white house this morning, the political nightmare for the white house this morning, really, global strategic nightmare is pakistan. like i said last hour, our troops on the ground if you believe what's younger and others say, consider pakistan to be the enemy. but as i said last hour, pakistan is also our dispensable ally in this region. so, we're going to have to figure out whether that can be squared or not and pakistan has to figure out what they're going to be moving forward. you know, mika, this -- i heard your father talking about how there's a war going on inside of pakistan and we shouldn't throw them over and i agree. they are the most dangerous country in the world. but also, the most important to us in this region. but this weekend, a friend asked me to call a mother who had to
8:04 am
bury her son on saturday. he was 21 years old. and he was killed by a sniper's bullet in afghanistan. had been there for less than one month. 21 years old and he was buried in jacksonville, florida, on friday. i'm sorry, on saturday. and i just wonder how much longer americans are going to be patient as we bury our sons and our daughters as pakistan tries to figure out whether they're going to be our ally or support the taliban. and i have got to believe that patience with this war is going to be on -- is going to be on the decline if we don't get more of a policy direction. that's what the white house has to underline today. they have to explain this relationship with afghanistan and they have got to -- with pakistan. they have got to tell us the
8:05 am
truth. >> all right. and also adding to that impatience that you say may grow, in light of these documents and other revelations, let's take a look at what else is in the documents. obviously, the war is getting more attention in the headlines today because of the release of more than 90,000 classified -- called field reports. they span from 2004 to january of this year. and were made public by wikileaks. it's interesting. i hadn't heard of them before. they're an online organization that says its goal is disclosing secret documents to reveal the behavior of government. among the most shocking findings is what joe pointed out. pakistan may actually be working against the u.s. effort, allowing representatives of its spy service to meet directly with the taliban in secret strategy sessions to organize networks of militant groups that fight against american soldiers in afghanistan and even hatch plots to assassinate afghan
8:06 am
leaders. it also reveals that the taliban has used heat-seeking missiles to shoot down u.s. helicopters and that u.s. forces actually covered up a 2007 helicopter attack claiming that taliban brought down a coalition helicopter with conventional weaponry when instead they used a missile. pat buchanan, that's interesting to you on a number of levels. >> it may be the stinger miss e missiles sent in afghanistan to fight the soviets which were enormously successful of knocking down helicopters. we are trying to retrieve those all over the world since the end of the cold war because they're enormously effective weapons there and really deadly. >> ezra, i'd like to talk to ezra about this because i'd love to hear from your perspective how you think the release of these documents -- i'm not sure how many of you had a chance to look at this point but certainly got a great deal of "the washington post" and "new york times," which is breaking the story. how do you think they impact the
8:07 am
conversation about this war? >> i think it's honestly truly hard to tell. the thing about secret documents is make people think they have a deeper form of truth. why would they be secret, right? i think this is giving more vigor to the conversation. i don't think too many people in the conversation thought the war in afghanistan was going great yesterday but today there's a reason to talk about why it's not going great and the factors and the role of pakistan playing so it's a huge difficulty for the obama administration because it forces another round of conversation about what's gone wrong here and that's right after they put in petraeus and thought they had a reprieve of that analysis and giving him a chance to work whatever magic he can work. >> joe, looking at other things being revealed in the documents, including this. a top secret group of american forces specially tasked with hunting down taliban leaders and either killing or capturing them on the spot without a trial. the obama administration has
8:08 am
apparently increased the missions despite some killings of civilians. also this. nato troops relying on remote-controlled predator drones more and more heavily. however, the performance of the drone aircraft less effective than some portrayed. forcing american troops to undertake risky retrieval missions before the taliban can claim the drone's weaponry. we are looking at a lot of different realities that happen. >> right. >> in war. now being revealed through these documents. >> right. i wanted to ask ezra what the political impact of this was going to be because, rezra, obviously, the president's an i lies on capitol hill mainly republicans. you have had the left that's been anti-war left that's been muted while he's tripled the number of troops in afghanistan and sort of tripled down our strategy there. does that continue through the fall? is this one of those moments
8:09 am
where a leader on the left steps forward in the senate or in the house and takes a more active role in condemning this war? >> i think it's too early to tell. what makes it difficult to political impact of the documents is simply that this isn't an issue to cut on partisan lines. when this happens it's easy enough to see when it will fall out but remember michael steele said afghanistan was an unwinnable war and obama's war and he said 100 things tough for the republicans but this was the first one he had to apologize for because one that enough of them strongly ideologically disagreed with so it creates space on the left for an anti-war leader but because you have obama trying to make the war work and republicans on the other hand supporting it, there isn't that much oxygen in the political conversation for someone like that. but you know, if things continue going badly and saw more documents like this, you could imagine protest candidacies in
8:10 am
2012. things could go in unpreible directions here. >> joe, i want to read what the white house said. the white house came out strongly against the leaked reports saying they don't cover events in 2010 after the obama administration announced new strategy. jim jones, national security adviser said this in a statement. wikileaks made no effort to contact us about these documents. the united states government learned from news organizations that these documents would be posted. these irresponsible leaks will not impact our ongoing commitment to deepen our partnerships with afghanistan and pakistan, to defeat our common enemies and to support the aspirations of the afghan and pakistani people. joe? >> mike barnicle, i made a reference to general wes morland. obviously for those too young to remember, he went out and gave the press conferences, telling us everything was going fine in vietnam. when i hear national security
8:11 am
adviser jim jones talking about how we're going to deepen our partnership with pakistan, that's necessary. i hope it can happen. but we live in an age, mike, where people aren't going to just swallow statements from the white house whole. they're going to have to admit that soldiers on the ground believe that it is the pakistanis that are killing their buddies. they're going to have to admit that this is a messy, messy situation and that pakistan is not a reliable ally or i suspect, mike, what we may see as we move forward is -- and it will probably come from the left, something a bit like 1968 where you have a progressive wing of the democratic party and anti-war wing of the democratic party rising up against a progressive president. politically. >> joe, i don't think there's any doubt about that. i mean, the one thing that the release of the documents does do is probably reinforce what a lot
8:12 am
of people already knew. i don't think there's anything startingly new in the documents here. but what it does do is it will raise the level of conversation/debate about afghanistan and raise the question perhaps to be asked to be in the united states senate, perhaps in hearings, why are we in afghanistan? because at the end of the day, afghanistan means one thing here in this country. and it is this. with a military effort, the size and the scope of which we are engaged in afghanistan, you cannot conduct a successful military effort, any military effort, no matter how you define success, without the support of the country behind that military effort. and there is no investment in this country other than those noble military families with sons and daughters serving abroad who have invested in this war. >> okay. but ezra klein, as we continue this conversation and look at it from that angle, with great respect to the people who are making the ultimate sacrifice and losing loved ones in this
8:13 am
war, like the mother of joe spoke to the over the week, how then though do we not question whether or not we should be there, especially looking at these documents? and whether or not we should be ramping up in such a big way. >> i think we do question it. i mean, one of the big unknowns here is whether the obama administration actually does want to pull out in 2011. as they previously scheduled to do and beneath the conversation for a long time. >> yeah. >> because on the one hand, they can say in 2011, listen, this war is not going well. we gave it our best shot. you saw from not only the documents but telling you we ourselves we have done what we can here and time to go. or, if they don't want to pull out, if that was a sort of way to build support until they get enough indicators of turnaround they could ramp up their commitment. this creates a larger problem for them. i think absolutely we should be questioning it and that's one of the ways in which the wikileaks documents i think are healthy. we don't have a draft like we
8:14 am
did in vietnam. but it still needs to be debated. >> pat buchanan? >> in 1968, we had the tet offensive at the end of the january. ezra, are you suggesting that obama could have a surge in afghanistan? because i don't think that's politically tenable at all, quite frankly. they seem to be walking away from their july 2011 deadline for beginning withdrawals. talking about conditions based. but politically, this thing is slipping away from the administration, is it not? >> well, i agree that it's slipping away. remember, they have one surge there already and my point is a little bit different. what do they want to do? because if what they wanted to do is find enough indicators of success to tell people to maintain the commitments to finish the job or even increase it because they have got the tall been on the ropes, words we have heard before, of course; this creates a problem.
8:15 am
things like this create a problem for them. if instead what they want to do is begin a withdrawal in july 2011, this is not a problem for them but gets people ready for the idea that we should be leaving there fairly soon. >> joe, let's boil this all down. what do you think the major takeaways are from this? what will be in the op-eds in the coming days pouring through the documents trying to make sense of them? >> i don't think you need to read op-eds in the coming days. read the lead of "the new york times" this morning. talking about how the documents paint a grim mosaic of why the united states has spent $300 billion in afghanistan. why we have lost so many men and women there. and, why our reputation is now on the line in afghanistan. despite all of that investment, almost nearly a decade, the taliban is stronger today than ever before. and the united states' position there is weaker today than ever
8:16 am
before. and we've got our main ally aiding our enemy. it is an absolute mess, mika. an absolute mess. >> joe, thanks for taking a break from your break to chime in on this. president obama is in the news again. his daytime tv appearance this week will be history in the making. the story is next. up next, we'll bring in ford ceo alan mulally. our all-star panel breaks down the biggest issues to influence voters in november. but first bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill? >> good morning, mika. we talked about tropical storm bonnie. as we go into the end of july, this is the tropics heat up. we were expecting a blockbuster season. so far, so good. the tropics are quiet. at least to start this week and fantastic. remember, august, september, october the three peak months of the hurricane season. what are we dealing with today? not like yesterday with
8:17 am
100-degree heat. widespread. today, better than that. airports looking fantastic. humidity is down in the northeast and in the mid-atlantic. enjoy that today from d.c. up to boston. forecast about as good as it gets. summer heat and no humidity. you can enjoy that today. the humidity is still around in the southeast and that will spark after storms and 100-degree heat continues in dallas. toasty there for friends in denver, 95. here, kitty. here, kitty.
8:18 am
8:19 am
oh! just come snuggle with mama. [ male announcer ] missing something? like 2 pairs of glasses fo$99.99 at sears optical, with bifocal lenses for just $25 more per pair. hurry in to sears optical today and don miss a thing.
8:20 am
8:21 am
i don't agree with very much that newt gingrich wants to do but the biggest difference is newt has a ton of ideas to move the country forward. there are no ideas in the republican party of congress. they desperately need leadership and whatever you think of newt gingrich, he can supply intellectual leadership so i hope he does run. >> welcome back. 21 past the hour. with us now, chief white house correspondent at politico, mike allen who's here with the morning playbook. mike, president obama apparently visiting new york city later this week and making a stop at a certain talk show. this is going to make history. >> it sure is. mika, the president saw joe scarborough on "the view" and said that's what i need.
8:22 am
>> exactly. >> on wednesday up for the dnc fund-raiser, stopping by the set and airing the next day, thursday. barbara walters coming back early for this. the first time a sitting president on a daytime talk show just as this president was the first ever to go on leno and letterman. >> i thought it was interesting, a couple of different moves the white house is making. i'll throw it out in a second but i read on politico last night about the white house putting, you know, different operatives, campaign workers, however you would describe them in alabama, louisiana but many more of them in florida. explain. >> yeah. white house is doing a rapid response down there. they realize they were on the defense in all of those states, and so, robert gibbs called them in to his office. gave them a pep talk about the points the make and now down
8:23 am
there workingi ining as if it's campaign. florida important to the president in 2012. >> guys, chime in. halperin? >> the president awesome on "the view." >> hallman? >> florida is everything. >> yeah, wow. you're real game changers here. thanks for coming in. so helpful. mike allen, thanks very much. ford ceo 50 is next and erin burnett's top three business headlines.
8:24 am
man: be kind to your eyes with transitions lenses. transitions adapt to changing light so you see your whole day comfortably and conveniently while protecting your eyes from the sun. ask your eyecare professional which transitions lenses are right for you. woman: are you a vsp member? your satisfaction with transitions lenses is guaranteed. visit transitions.com/vsp or ask your vsp doctor for details. ♪ [ upbeat instrumental ] [ rattling ] [ gasps ] [ rattling ] [ laughing ] [ announcer ] close enough just isn't good enough. - if your car is in an accident, - [ laughing continues ] make sure it's repaired with the right replacement parts. travelers. take the scary out of life.
8:25 am
with their autobahn for all event. it ends soon. they got great prices. cars built for the autobahn. people are gonna be driving crazy in the jetta... ...the routan, and the cc. that cc is gorgeous. that jetta is awesome. my wife loves her new routan. and they all come with that carefree maintenance. scheduled maintenance included. we're not shopping for cars here, people. c'mon! well, i am now. that's kind of exciting. [ male announcer ] right now, get 0% apr on 2010 models, excluding tdi. or get a great price on a certified pre-owned volkswagen.
8:26 am
8:27 am
all right. before you do anything this morning, you need to get a check on business before the bell with cnbc's erin burnett live at new york stock exchange. top one story today? >> you get one story today. >> one, okay. >> alan mulally came on, did a great interview. one great story to talk about bp tony hayward. tony hayward is out. everyone expects this. as soon as it's capped he's gone. what a shocker. >> is that news? >> no. we have the pay compensation of what he'll get when he leaves. >> this is going to make me very angry. >> i don't know. i mean, this is -- i'm curious whether it makes you kaangry or not. he is entitled to onier of pay
8:28 am
which is u.s. dollars just about $1.6 million and entitled to the value of the pension over the 28 years he served at bp. which comes out to $16.7 million. you are looking at somewhere just around $20 million for him to leave. are you angry? >> just -- i don't know. >> 26 years. >> yeah. >> 28 years, yeah. >> managed probably the worst environmental disaster committed by his company in history and i'm thinking maybe that money could goes to the fund to help the people in the gulf. >> maybe it could. >> too moral? >> all i'm going to say is looking at compensation of executives compared to regular people in britain, they got nothing on us, mika. they got nothing. bob for a delly leaving home depot or those that left pfizer after widely perceived of weak performance and bad stock performance, both got $200 million. in accrued health care, pension
8:29 am
benefits never mind stock options and everything else. his number of $20 million may sound bad right now but it's the golden parachute like coal in the stocking for an american ceo. it just something to think about because here in the u.s. you have ceos making on average 400 to 500 times the regular worker. in the uk 30 to 40 times. so i don't know. >> okay. >> okay. all right. erin burnett. >> can i -- >> it's awkward here because i have a ceo right here. >> it's not. you know why? >> why? >> this guy, his company took no government money. >> that's true. we are good. we are good. ford launching a new suv in the midst of a national debate over energy policies and falling auto sales. why is ford so confident? joining us is alan mulally. thank you for coming on the set today. >> glad to be here. >> first of all, i'll ask you
8:30 am
about electric cars. i'm going to ask you about the choices you have made. you will have the new explorer. tell us about it but first tell the mileage. >> very good. the exact mileage we are still certifying with the epa but 30% improvement over the previous explorers which is incredible improvement of fuel mime mileage and 15% reduction of co2. >> what's the engine size? >> you can get e-4 with direct fuel injection and turbo charging and get you to 30% and 15% reduction or you can go with the v6 which is a little bit higher horsepower, 297. giving two good choices. >> don't the explorers in general -- what's the numbers on it though? >> today's explorer's around 16 to 20. clearly we are going to be 30% or better. >> okay. interesting. >> mr. mulally, doesn't get any
8:31 am
16 to 20. >> but you -- but it does everything you want. >> it is the finest vehicle. i had the other one for 12 years. great. i hated to give it up. magnificent car. >> please share this again. >> terrific, pat. all right. let me ask you. >> it is a great, great car. it is my truck. that's what we call it. >> yes? >> given the fact we're talking about going green and trying to get off the dependence of foreign oil, is this smart to put out -- i mean, great that the mileage is better than past explorers but still part of an ongoing problem. >> i understand completely. i'd love to give you our perspective on it. ford, three years ago we made important decisions to take ford in a different direction. one to focus on the ford brand and why we divested the other ones and a complete family of vehicles to give the consumers choices they want. small, medium or large, car, utility or truck. the other commitment we have made is every new vehicle that you got from ford best in class with the new best in the world this terms of quality, fuel
8:32 am
efficien efficiency, safety, design and value. our road map says we have a lot of room to improve the engine today and that's why the lightweight materials, aero dynamics and then the leadership position for the hybrids like the cars and then more electric vehicles and this week the chick magnet. >> yes. >> all electric this year and then next year the focus which is our mid-sized sedan will be all electric, also. so you're going to see from ford, we are going to continue to be on the leading edge of the technologies. but if i could just add one more thing to your point, the most important thing that we do in the united states is get a systems solution for not only using the electricity but generating the electricity clean. we need a system solution both on the generation and on the use and we'll be there for the solution on the use.
8:33 am
>> you know, i have a two-part question for you. >> yes. >> for decades, the american automobile industry bumping along in second place largely to the japanese. that seems to be improving a bit. >> yes. >> principally because of ford's performance. for years, you helped run boeing. >> yes. >> airplane manufacturer. how do you translate your ceo skills to an automobile manufacturer and the second part of the question with regard to technology, is it possible for ford, detroit, anybody to come up with an ignition system that prevents kids from texting or telephoning while they're driving? >> the answer on the second one is not only yes but make it seamless, voice activated, hands on the wheel, eyes on the road and offering now with our ford my ford and sync. on your first question, it's really interesting because you think of bill boeing and boeing, commercial airplanes. the worldwide industry leader
8:34 am
and henry ford, 1903 on ford's case, 1916 on boeing's case. both leaders absolutely committed to safe and efficient transportation for all of us. not just for a few and all of us. in henry's case, the neatest vision he had, took out an ad in 1924 on -- in the saturday evening post and said opening the highways to all man kind. now, you think about the similarities of boeing and ford. it is the same enabling technology. it's the same efficiency and quality. it is the same safety features. and it's huge scale. globally, complex products. a car might have 10,000 parts and an airplane has 4 million. but the point is, that it's an absolute laser focus on safe and efficient transportation for all of us. similarities are much more than dissimilar. >> all fords and all boeings were made in the united states. how many of the fords now if you
8:35 am
break it down made in america and how many made abroad? >> 75% of the vehicles used in the united states are made in the united states. this is really interesting, pat, because another part of henry ford originally was that he wanted to operate in all the countries in which he served the countries so he was way ahead of his time. he wasn't about exporting to bring the money back so everything we do around the world we try to honor that fundamental vision he had. so, wherever ford is, you can work there, have great careers there and get the best cars and trucks. >> let me come back to the environmental thing. cap and trade basically died in the senate. are you happy about that or what's the right way forward from ford's point of view to manage this at the regulatory level? >> i think we'll end up with a few things coming together because i think it's three things that need to be addressed simultaneously and not like a news flash but clearly the policy needs to address economic growth, right? energy independence and security but also environmental
8:36 am
sustainability. now, in ford's case, we are absolutely pleased to be part of that solution. like we participate in the 2007 energy independence and security act. the one standard in the united states with fuel mileage and co2. we'll partner with the government and what we need is a system solution, energy policy, clearly. manufacturing with the big "m" for the united states to keep the fantastic industry in u.s. competitiveness. if we do those together and everything on policy enables us to move forward, we'll be just fine. >> alan mulally, the explorer, can we afford it? >> you can. it's going to be the -- >> i can? >> you can afford it. we'll release the prices on the internet this afternoon and be besides the quality -- >> you have to tell me the price. i need the price. >> best value. >> really? >> release it this afternoon. i'll make sure you get an e-mail. >> doesn't want to step on his lead. 35 grand? >> release them this afternoon. you're relentless.
8:37 am
>> yes. i buy used cars, too. i don't think i can afford it. >> another neat thing is that because we've been matching the production to real demand then the value of the used cars gone uppingser, also. not only good used cars but -- >> look at him. thank you very much. >> you're welcome. thank you. >> midterm exam is next. >> remember, drive a ford and deal a difference. no other medicine, not even advil pm, is more effective for pain and sleeplessness. new motrin pm.
8:38 am
and this one i'm taking to the house. the ice cream man is here! breyers all natural grasshopper pie. walmart's the only place you can get it. they love it when i take my work home with me. [ shaniya ] daddy i want more ice cream.
8:39 am
8:40 am
now to the "morning joe" midterm exam. the rats races that matter the. we sat down with our panel to break it all down. >> let's look at the influencers, the people who will be influencing this election. start with the independents. when's driving independents right now? >> right now what's driving independents is driving i think a lot of folks overall, which is this concern about the economy. and independents have been these folks that have already left the political parties. we've been watching this over 20 years.
8:41 am
moving away from identifying with the republicans or the democrats and they're sort of driven, i think, by events of the day. so, independents, for instance, lost by the republicans over competency and management of the war and of katrina. and right now, democrats are suffering and the president over management of the economy and concern about the economy. an enso, these are the -- this is a group of folks and the real question i think all of us in midterm is how many show up? which way do they vote? a lot of them might not show up other than in nevada where they get to vote in none of the above. >> gene, it's been so volatile, the independents in '04. they went with bush. in '06 with pelosi. democrats, '08. obama. '10, back to a republican party, 20% approval rating? >> chuck asked the right question, do they show up? have the republicans given them a reason. >> do they need more reason? >> i think they do, actually. >> or just a no against the democrats. >> polls are not showing that the republicans are shooting out
8:42 am
the lights. republicans -- the approval rating for republicans in congress is lower than that for democrats in congress. so, it's not -- you know, what the republicans have not given them is what you guys gave them in '94. a contract with america. a program, a set of ideas or policies that people can believe in. i think that's been a mistake. >> pat, if the republicans haven't given their agenda a plan specifically, can you beat something with nothing in off year elections? >> the republicans haven't given them a reason to vote republican but the democrats have. barack obama and the administration, this is an anti-election coming up, joe. independents and take it ethically. barack obama did very well among white voters, very well, even white working class folks. the white middle class is gone. the african-american community is still 24-1 or whatever it is but lost the enthusiasm, energy,
8:43 am
fire. the real fire out there is the people want to go and vote against barack obama and socialism, whatever you call it. the economic decision of chuck, 40%. no other issue that reached 10%. >> let's just remember. the most, the most decisive elections, any time we have ever had, are usually rooted in some sort of anti- or anger. the last time of a decisive election in a positive, that was run with a positive was lyndon johnson in '64. every other decisive, '74, '80, through the line, '94, 2006, 2008, had a root of anger and anti. >> what about using the president along the way to help democrats? >> parts of the country to use the president of the united states. other parts you cannot. we talked with joe sus tech. i don't know where i don't pennsylvania you bring him in to a tight race there. he went in to missouri for
8:44 am
carnahan, kansas city. various places where the president of the united states does good and other places you don't want to take him. >> chuck, obviously in the deep south you don't take the president. do you bring the president in if you're meek to help you from florida? >> that race, certainly. that is a bizarre -- there's a bizarre three-way dynamic and the president won't come for meek because of charlie crist. >> what about missouri? >> i think will end up bringing him in this st. louis. i would make this argument to democrats is that all of the bad is already there. okay? all of the good which is trying to get the base out, particularly in st. louis, isn't going to be there without the president sort of fired up. so missouri's going to be fascinating. this overall, the president can be youzed to save senate races. where he is a real drag on the swing house districts because most of them are in places he didn't win in 2008. so, that's -- i think that's
8:45 am
where we sort of had two different dynamics. patty murray, barbara boxer, russ fine gold, florida. that's -- we throw that away. >> so strange. >> but you don't -- you won't bring him to jasonali altmeijer district. >> bill clinton is the guy you send to the parts of pennsylvania where you don't want to send barack obama. but chuck brings a really salient point in that the democrats won a lot of house seats the last two elections that, you know, generally would be thought of as republican seats. or that certainly in the past have been republican seats. >> let's underline that for a moment. the democrats have had almost historic back to back victories in '06 in the house and '08 in the house. there was going to be a realignment regardless -- if unemployment were at 4% the democrats would be scrambling. >> not building on '06 and '08
8:46 am
in 2010. >> as we look at influencers, is there any concept out there and i look at the tea party that really could influence this next election cycle to an extent where you see a mark or is this -- >> unions. >> tea party has brought us passion. they have brought -- >> sure. >> a new sort of passion. i think it's brought some new people into the political process and those people are going to come out and vote most of them at least against the democrats so that's going to -- that's in favor of the republicans i think until they get re-elected. then i don't know what it means for the republicans. when, you know, welcome to the meet the tea party caucus. >> great discussion. thanks to our panel. more "morning joe" when we come back. [ male announcer ] where are people with moderate to severe
8:47 am
rheumatoid arthritis going? they're discovering the first self-injectable ra medicine you take just once a month. it's simponi™, and taken with methotrexate, it helps relieve the pain, stiffness, and swelling of ra with one dose a month. visit 4simponi.com to see if you qualify for a full year of cost support. simponi™ can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious and sometimes fatal events can occur, such as infections, cancer in children and adults, heart failure, nervous system disorders, liver or blood problems, and allergic reactions. before starting simponi™, your doctor should test you for tb and assess your risk of infections, including fungal infections and hepatitis b. ask your doctor if you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections,
8:48 am
or develop symptoms such as fever, fatigue, cough, or sores. you should not start simponi™ if you have an infection. [ female announcer ] ask your rheumatologist about simponi™. just one dose, once a month.
8:49 am
[ female announcer ] ask your rheumatologist about simponi™. fifteen percent or more on car insurance? can fútbol announcer andrés cantor make any sport exciting? ha sido una partida intensa hoy. jadrovski está pensando. está pensando. veamos que va a hacer. moverá la reina o moverá el caballo?
8:50 am
que tensión. viene... viene, viene, viene... gooooooooooooooool! geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. if you could have one wish come true this summer, what would it be? >> redo my life. >> you haven't a good summer? >> yeah. >> what do you hope for this summer? >> i hope for a house. >> what's it like living at the motel? >> like you're in hell underground and a devil is, like, being so mean. >> what is home to you? >> home? i don't really know what that means. >> that was a clip from alexandra pelosi documentariey r hbo, "homeless."
8:51 am
one of the country's richest areas. here to talk about the movie is filmmaker and journalist alexandra pelosi. i just melted. it just drive home so to speak the message, doesn't it? >> it does. and as a mother, you must be able to relate to this. i met your daughter. my media escort today and thinking imagine asking your daughter what's your dream and she said, to redo my life. >> ugh. >> just think of that. it's heartbreaking. >> that about sums it up. it looks amazing. >> thank you. >> what made you do a lot of different documentaries and work like this? what made you dive into this? >> well, as mark knows well, from many years i made political documentaries and then i had kids and my 2-year-old asked me a question i couldn't answer. why is that lady sleeping on the street? i couldn't come up with an answer. so, i went back to sheila nevins
8:52 am
at hbo and said that's the movie you have to make a movie about. >> i love it. >> were you sir prized at the extent of homeless families, largely single mothers sometimes living with children in motels paid for by state governments? >> well, what was shocking to me is these are people -- the people i followed are working for a living. they weren't government-funded. they were actually people that had jobs and they were working more than 40 hours a week but they couldn't afford a roof over their head and shocking thinking of homeless we think of people who aren't working and there's a certain stereotype and these are the people that are working poor living near or below the poverty. >> line. >> what's being charged by the hotels? >> $800, $900 a month. >> that could be a mortgage in some places but orange county it is expensive and not affordable housing and can't afford for a real -- >> what is in the film? hot plates in the rooms? >> soup kitchens, kids in
8:53 am
america in soup kitchens. you don't think in america kids have to line up in soup kitchens but they do every night in orange county, california. and a lot of zip codes in america. orange county is where i happen to go. they have so many millionaires and so many soup kitchens. >> how easy to approach the families? how conducive were they appearing and talking? >> they were trying to bring attention to the fact they had jobs and felt they weren't represented fairly because they -- most people think of homeless as being bums and these people are hard working and they have, you know, they're trying. and so, in this economy, you know, the recession economy, they still have jobs have, you know, is different than what people -- when you think of homeless you don't think of having jobs and working more than 40 hours a week. >> do you have a policy agenda here? i mean, it is interesting. >> no, i really don't. >> are you sure? >> no.
8:54 am
it is hard because i know it's politics and really hard because of my last -- i worked for ten years at nbc. >> i'm so sorry. if only you knew somebody in power like if you had contacts in washington. >> you know, i -- >> but you don't. >> homelessness was if you think back 10, 15, 20 years an issue with national discussion. an issue in washington, d.c. in places like orange county, you are pointing out, in a city you know well, san francisco, homelessness is a huge problem. you see homeless people in the streets and no one talks about it in terms of national policy discourse anymore so i'm wondering, are you trying to raise awareness on some level to try to restart that conversation? >> yes. thank you. good question. all right. see how defensive i am the moment you say do you have an agenda? with my last name i'm judged instantly. >> thank you. i hear you. >> she's trying to make a point. i was a journalist at nbc for
8:55 am
ten years. >> doesn't matter. you're alexandra pelosi. >> what is your agenda? >> well, i do want to raise awareness and i do think that the one thing that all republicans and all democrats would agree on is that if you have a job and work more than 40 hours a week you should have a roof over your head and kids in america should not be lining up in soup lines. >> i think we can agree on that, even at this table. catch the premier of "homeless: the motel kids of orange county" tonight at 9:00. thank you very much for bringing this to the table. >> thank you for giving some attention to the subject. >> i appreciate it. up next, what if anything did we learn today? "the daily rundown" is also straight ahead. here, kitty. here, kitty.
8:56 am
oh! just come snuggle with mama. [ male announcer ] missing something? like 2 pairs of glasses fo$99.99 at sears optical, with bifocal lenses for just $25 more per pair. hurry in to sears optical today and don miss a thing. hi, may i help you? yes, i hear progressive has lots of discounts on car insurance. can i get in on that? are you a safe driver? yes. discount! do you own a home? yes. discount! are you going to buy online? yes! discount! isn't getting discounts great? yes!
8:57 am
there's no discount for agreeing with me. yeah, i got carried away. happens to me all the time. helping you save money -- now, that's progressive. call or click today. with their autobahn for all event. it ends soon. they got great prices. cars built for the autobahn. people are gonna be driving crazy in the jetta... ...the routan, and the cc. that cc is gorgeous. that jetta is awesome. my wife loves her new routan. and they all come with that carefree maintenance. scheduled maintenance included. we're not shopping for cars here, people. c'mon! well, i am now. that's kind of exciting. [ male announcer ] right now, get 0% apr on 2010 models, excluding tdi. or get a great price on a certified pre-owned volkswagen.
8:58 am
8:59 am
all right. what we learned today as i have a copy of the letter the u.s. embassy to the first minister of scotland. exclusively here on "morning joe." bottom line here. this is pertaining to the release of al megrahi to libya. respects scottish law in this case. expresses concern that the united states opposes any release of al megrahi and also says that if you have to do this, conditional release on compassionate grounds is a far preferable alternative to a prisoner transfer. much more on that coming up and indicates -- this letter is august 12th, eight days b

tv
Morning Joe
MSNBC July 26, 2010 6:00am-9:00am EDT

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

TOPIC FREQUENCY Afghanistan 82, Pakistan 67, Taliban 18, Washington 14, Joe 12, Libya 11, Mike Barnicle 9, Obama Administration 9, Mika 9, Pat Buchanan 8, Obama 8, Florida 8, New Jersey 7, Barack Obama 7, Pat 7, London 7, Kitty 6, John Kerry 6, Volkswagen 6, Mark Halpern 6
Network MSNBC
Duration 03:00:00
Video Codec mpeg2video
Audio Cocec mp2
Pixel width 720
Pixel height 480
Sponsor Internet Archive
Audio/Visual sound, color


disc Borrow a DVD of this show
info Stream Only
Uploaded by
TV Archive
on 10/13/2011
Views
149